Knit The Sky

Press/Media Resources


Cover Image Downloads



Illustrations: Lauren Nassef

Illustrations: Lauren Nassef
Knit The Sky Cover
[High Res JPG]
Knit The Sky Back Cover
[High Res JPG]

Author Image Downloads


Photo Credit: Leafcutter Designs

Photo Credit: Leafcutter Designs

Photo Credit: Lauren Sinton

Photo Credit: Ginger Howard
Lea Redmond
[High Res JPG]
Lea Redmond
[High Res Trans PNG]
Lea Redmond
[High Res JPG]
Lea Learning to Knit
[High Res JPG]

Events & Publicity


Author Q&A

  • Download this Q&A in Word (docx) format -->

  • How do you like to describe your book to someone who knows nothing about it?
    Sometimes I begin by saying something about combining knitting with conceptual art, or saying that I design process-based knitting projects in which a poetic activity influences the look of the garment. But that's a lot of abstraction. People's eyes really light up when I start talking about the Sky Scarf. At that point, I often hear people telling me that they've never been interested in knitting before, but now they want to learn just so they can make a Sky Scarf! The last thing I love to tell people about the book is that even though it's full of knitting projects, it's also about living creatively more generally. Someone could easily read my book and apply the ideas to breakfast instead of wool hats. The sky is the limit!

  • You say creativity isn't always tidy.
    What do you recommend as the best way to begin dreaming up your own original project?

    If you want to make something special—something that is uniquely you—but you don't know where to begin, I recommend starting by getting in touch with whatever is most important to you. Anything you care deeply about can turn into a great knitting project; you just have to figure out how to translate all those emotions into something tangible. My favorite college professor once gave me great advice about how to learn what was most important to me. He said to watch myself—to take note whenever my heart leapt—because if I could string all those leaps together and figure out the pattern, I'll discover my mysterious most important thing. I am 100% convinced that this is true for everyone.

  • What do you say to people who claim not to be creative and just want to follow a pattern and knit exactly the item shown in a book, with the very same yarn and the very same needles?
    I say that they'll probably make beautiful garments that way! And sometimes that's enough. But I also invite them to take a little time to ask themselves questions before they begin, such as: Can I swap in a different color that's more meaningful? Or, can I use this pattern as the technical backbone for a conceptual project? "Knitting the sky" certainly doesn't mean abandoning well-designed patterns. It also doesn't require an ability to just "wing it" technically. It means combining our technical abilities and resources with our poetic ones. Beautiful garments and radically meaningful processes make a great pair!

  • Have you had any particularly moving experiences when you followed one of your creative prompts for a knitting project?
    If you read my book, you'll learn about a sad little love story in "Quantum Entanglement." In it, I begin knitting a delicate, cabled necktie for a man that my heart is waiting for. As it becomes clear that the relationship is not going to work out, it's hard to keep knitting the tie. At this point—and this happened after I wrote the book—one of my dearest lady friends picked it up off my desk, needles still in the stitches, and wrapped it around her wrist, saying "I think it would make beautiful friendship bracelets." That was the answer! This necktie needed to switch gears, and so did I. So I turned the half-knit necktie into friendship bracelets—one for me and one for my friend. Three cheers for moving on, and having a knitting life that is adaptable to my heart's needs.

Blog Posts